You got some ‘splainin’ to do!

There has been a lot of talk lately from those concerned with our environment who are constantly seeking ‘sustainability’ and zero-energy design.       The whole intent is to avoid impacting the environment with our wasteful lifestyles.        We’ve got green this and green that supposedly to make sure we don’t impact the earth’s delicate balance.

But now we have Smart Growth coming to Newburyport.       This whole concept is based on the inevitability of growth in a community.      A growth that would cause increased pressure on the environment, a loss of open space and a greater demand for infrastructure and resources.      Smart Growth says growing is inevitable and it will always occur and therefore we can mitigate this inevitable occurrence by managing it.        You couple that with the dark siders who think industrial growth, in particular, construction growth is the way to prosperity and you’ve got two groups out to bury us.

The problem with both is the intense desire that we must grow and that this growth will ensure wealth for the community and that increasing density of population in a smaller space will allow for this to happen.

If you look at Newburyport’s past, one of the great things about our city is the very slow growth!

2013 – 17,800     2.2%
2010 – 17,416       1.3%
2000 – 17,239      5.3%
1990 –16,317       2.6%

When we started having poor economies, the population actually reduced as people fled the poverty or negative economy in our area:

1980 – 15,900.     .06% (recovering from the shuttering of the downtown)
1970 – 15,807     12.9%

1960 – 14,004       -8% (an indication of industrial decay)
1950 – 14,111     1.4%

1940 – 13,916   -7.7% (The total results of the Great Depression)
1930 – 15,084

Unfortunately, the philosophy of Smart Growth looks at Singapore with 19,000 people per square mile and turns and says to little Newburyport; one day you’ll be that squeezed and you should be thankful that Smart Growth is at least mitigating the inevitable. (It would also require the historic district demolished, huge skyscrapers leaping into the sky; and a huge increase in sophisticated infrastructure.

I realize I am using the extreme, but the point is,

WHY IS IT NECESSARY TO DESTROY OUR BEAUTIFUL HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOODS FOR ‘GROWH’?

WHY IS IT NECESSARY TO CRAM MORE PEOPLE INTO NEWBURYPORT?

WHY IS THE PACKING IN OF RESIDENCES AROUND THE TRAFFIC CIRCLE SO NECESSARY THAT IT WOULLD DESTABILIZE OUR SCHOOL SYSTEM AND DEMAND A RAPID INCREASE IN SERVICES? (AND DEMAND THE BUIILDING OF MORE SCHOOL SPACE!)

I was part of the Strategic Land Use Committee and when they pictured developers putting in buildings and increasing the commercial activity around the traffic circle; they did not factor in a massive increase in human habitation.        Somehow, this entire Smart Growth concept demands that we destroy the equilibrium of our society by bringing in more people into the city.

We’re seeing talk about 500 to 800 units with the minimal result of 300 plus students into our school system.      The traffic and the services must be increased around the city to accommodate all these new arrivals.        No 40S reimbursement is going to cover new buildings that must be constructed when the new Bresnahan has no capacity for a huge jump in students!

 IN OTHER WORDS, NEWBURYPORT ISN’T PREPARED AND DOESN’T UNDERSTAND THE NEGATIVE IMPACT OF A MASSIVE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT.

Smart Growth says we must to stem the rapid increase in population coming to Newburyport.

WHERE IS THE EVIDENCE OF THIS RAPID INCREASE?

It is our slow, easily manageable stable population that has made us an envy in the region.

2013 – 17,800     2.2%
2010 – 17,416       1.3%
2000 – 17,239      5.3%
1990 –16,317       2.6%

WHY DO WE WANT TO DESTABLIZE OUR COMMUNITY AND THUS REDUCE OUR HIGH QUALITY OF LIFE?

-P. Preservationist
http://www.ppreservationist.com

PS. The answer is easy – more money, more money, more money made by a handful of well-placed developers and a few very well-lined pockets.

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This entry was posted in Affordable Housing, Businesses, Developers, Economics, Education, Health and wellness, Open Space, Planning, Preservation, Quality of Life, Real Estate. Bookmark the permalink.

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